The Weekly Roundup 26/11/19

The Weekly Roundup: Hello baby! Machine learning helping to understand placental health, did Shakespeare have help? And advances in health and medicine thanks to AI.

> The Weekly Roundup: Hello baby! Machine learning helping to understand placental health, did Shakespeare have help? And advances in health and medicine thanks to AI. Renee Dubé [November 26, 2019]

Considering it is something that keeps the human race going, maternal and placental health is still not properly understood, which proves extremely detrimental to the health of mother and baby during pregnancy. Thanks to a new development in AI technology, that will begin to change. We’re also looking at how educators in the US are frantically searching for a better solution to interpretations services that help communicate with non-English speaking families and we look at the leaps and bounds being made in medicine thanks to machine learning.

1. Using artificial intelligence to analyze placentas

Using AI to determine the health of placenta and baby
Using AI to determine the health of placenta and baby

Research is under way to aid pathologists in better understanding placental development and how it can benefit both mother and baby during pregnancy. Artificial intelligence will study both sides of the placenta in order to determine the placenta’s health and any risks associated to the pregnancy. The end goal being that the technology will aid many women during and after their pregnancies, especially in areas of lower income; these places tend to have less resources and hence more complications during pregnancy and childbirth.

Read more here

2. Education Department’s phone translation system clogged with long waits, dropped calls: teachers

Educators in the US are struggling with a lack of translation technology and lacklustre interpretation services when it comes to parent/teacher interviews with non-English speaking families. After the US Education Department switched interpretation service vendors earlier this year, educators are dealing with extremely long wait times, calls constantly being dropped and often times no pick ups at all. Teachers are having to rely on fellow bilingual staff to interpret important information to families about their students.

Read more here

3. Machine learning has revealed exactly how much of a Shakespeare play was written by someone else

Shakespeare didn't always work alone
Shakespeare didn't always work alone

It’s been a mystery that has been plaguing literary analysts since 1850, but thanks to AI technology, we now know that Shakespeare wasn’t just a one man show. It has been discovered that fellow playwright of the time, John Fletcher contributed to passages to Shakespeare’s Henry VIII. AI studied both men’s works and writing characteristics and analysed how much of each was prevalent in the play. As it turns out, it is believed that Fletcher co-wrote about 50% of Henry VIII.

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4. Paging Dr. Robot: Artificial intelligence moves into care

Stress and ill mental health unfortunately often go hand in hand with university students and so the University of Southern California has developed AI programs for students to talk to during trying times. Using an AI and virtual reality character Ellie and AI-based program, Ask Ari, students are able to talk to both Ellie and Ari, that will in turn give them information about when to talk to a counsellor and vital resources to improve their mental wellbeing. The aim is to not replace therapists, but rather work with them to determine “who is most likely to be suffering.”

Read more here.

5. Lung cancer: AI shows who will benefit from immunotherapy

AI is helping to determine the benefits of immunotherapy on lung cancer patients
AI is helping to determine the benefits of immunotherapy on lung cancer patients

The fight to cure cancer is stronger than ever, and again doctors and scientists are looking to AI programs to help determine which lung cancer patients would benefit from immunotherapy. A relatively new form of treatment, “immunotherapy works by boosting a person’s immune response against cancer tumours.” The AI model, being developed by a team led by researchers in Case Western University, will help doctors determine, which patients are responding to the immunotherapy, resulting in higher survival rates as well as lessening unnecessary costs.

Read more here

Conclusion

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