The Weekly Roundup 22/10/19

The Weekly Roundup: Travelling back in time with AI, learning the love of translation and why it is imperative to get more interpreters in courthouses to aid domestic violence cases

It’s another big week in AI news, from assisting in search and rescue methods to aiding doctors in detecting brain bleeds, it’s being proven time and time again how Artificial Intelligence can help humanity in meaningful ways. We also see that AI is helping historians create a portal into the past of Europe and creating virtual worlds that we can experience. In other news, one woman is advocating for more support and resources for translators in domestic violence cases and one author and translator explains her love for language and translation.

1. Walking through time: how AI is rebuilding centuries-old Europe

Forget the DeLorean, AI is making time travel possible
Forget the DeLorean, AI is making time travel possible

Europe is renowned for its diverse, centuries-long history and culture and now AI is helping us to travel back in time to experience the European days of old. Experts including computer scientists and historians have gathered in Dresden, Germany to discuss how best to use AI to document Europes expansive history. Virtual worlds is at the top of their list. AI will have the arduous task of transcribing documents that will in turn show us just how Europeans lived in the past. Virtual worlds built upon this data, will allow us to experience how cities and towns looked in various years over time.

Read more here

2. Australian court interpreters working with domestic violence survivors call for more support

Interpreters are vital in domestic violence cases for non-English speakers in Australia and yet there is a lack of resources in the legal system. Interpreter for the legal sector, Liana Papoutsis says that the lack of interpreters for domestic violence cases can be somewhat attributed to the impact the cases have on the interpreters. “Interpreters have been traumatised by family violence details, and…many will avoid family violence matters, whether it is for a family violence intervention order, or breaches, which move the matter from the civil to the criminal,” she said. She is urging for services to be put in place to ensure that interpreters get the support they need during and after difficult cases. This will hopefully, in turn encourage interpreters to take on domestic violence cases, where they are very much needed.

Read more here

3. Artificial intelligence to enhance Aussie search and rescue capabilities

AI assisted search and rescue will aid the ADF and many SAR teams Australia wide
AI assisted search and rescue will aid the ADF and many SAR teams Australia wide

Australian search and rescue teams have it tough. Trying to find people in water, bushland and desert is a daunting and taxing job and “has largely been done in the same way for a hundred years – using unaided visual search to find objects.”

The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is now using and AI system that will change the way search and rescue teams are able to, well, search and rescue. The ADF “enlisted the help of budding AI guru, Lieutenant Harry Hubbert, Warfare Innovation Navy Branch. We gave Harry a challenge – find an orange hull, in a large body of water, using AI, and do it in a month. Harry developed the algorithms in his own time within two weeks.”

Read more here

4. So you want my arts job: literary translator

“I resisted the call of literary translation for years, despite it being the perfect marriage of my interests, because I thought that I wouldn’t be able to feed myself if I had two vocations (writing and literary translation). Then I read Claudia Salazar Jiménez’s La sangre de la aurora and wanted to press it into the hands of everyone I knew.” This thought-provoking piece featuring author and translator, Elizabeth Byer tells us how she got into the world of translating and why. For any budding translators out there, the interview goes into detail about how to get started, useful resources and just what is so magical about being able to retell a story from one language to another.

Read more here

5. Doctors could team up with AI to spot dangerous brain bleeds faster

Easier and quicker detection in brain injuries and trauma could be potentially lifesaving
Easier and quicker detection in brain injuries and trauma could be potentially lifesaving

Brain bleeds, head injuries and strokes can be particularly hard to detect and diagnose, which can lead to life-altering or ending circumstances. A team at the University of California, San Francisco are developing AI software that will assist doctors in determining the diagnoses of such cases. The software, called PatchFCN is able to “interpret CT scans of heads”, which at times can be somewhat more difficult for doctors who are trying to find a tiny area in the brain from just a scanned image. While the AI will not be replacing specialised doctors, the hope is for it to be able to help the doctors make diagnoses quicker and easier, resulting in potentially lifesaving outcomes.

Read more here

Conclusion

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