The Weekly Roundup 15/10/19

The Weekly Roundup: Babies teaching us how best to teach AI, glasses made for translation and keeping an eye on our giant fishy friends with the help of Artificial Intelligence

> The Weekly Roundup: Babies teaching us how best to teach AI, glasses made for translation and keeping an eye on our giant fishy friends with the help of Artificial Intelligence Renee Dubé [November 07, 2019]

More than just cute little stinkers, babies are exceptional learners, so good in fact that we’re trying to simulate their learning process to assist AI in becoming evermore smarter. Our first article details just how babies learn and what they’re doing to make AI do the same. Plus, machine learning is helping us prepare and respond to natural disasters and an app is now available to help content creators reach their target market, with the click of a button.

1. The Ultimate Learning Machines

The best learners in the universe come in a cute and tiny package
The best learners in the universe come in a cute and tiny package

They may appear to have no clue about the world around them, but “human babies are the best learners in the universe. How do they do it? And could we get AI to do the same?” That is the question that professor of psychology, Alison Gopnik is pondering as she and a team of computer scientists look at understanding how babies learn; and how they can teach AI to learn the same way. Teaching AIs how to process data and learn from that is one thing, giving them the ability to adapt and learn in a messier and more complex way is another.

Read more here

2. Why Machine Learning Is Critical for Disaster Response

As unfortunate as it is, natural disasters are a common occurence and arguably taking place more often as the years go by. So, what can we do about it? While that answer is better suited for another time and place (and possibly a whole thesis written on the subject), we can look at how to manage ourselves and our surrounds when these disasters take place. Machine learning is now being used to help better forecast when natural disasters may take place and how we can be better prepared for them.

Read more here

3. These AR Smart Glasses Could Be the Future of Multilingual Live Translation

Image courtesy of Zoi Meet
Image courtesy of Zoi Meet

It’s all about effectice communication in the business world and easier translation means easier transactions. The Zoi Meet app transcribes a persons speech automatically into text for a person wearing specific AR glasses. Available on the Vuzix Blade Smart Glasses, the app is aimed at businesses holding international and multilingual meetings.

We’re hoping these have a much higher success rate than Google Glass did.

Read more here

4. An app for content creators looking to connect with the right audience

Many of us know the struggle of creating content online, wanting to share it with the world and realising we’re not reaching the audience we’d hoped to. Enter Joynt, an app developed to allow content creators to interact and share with their target audience. Joynt allows you to create closed and secure groups with fans and followers, which in turn gives your followers exclusive access to your projects. There is the option to monetise content, meaning that as a content creator, you’re not only reaching your target audience but making money from it too.

Read more here

5. Artificial intelligence helps track sharks in the ocean

AI helping to keep track of sharks near California beaches
AI helping to keep track of sharks near California beaches

With summer almost here, this development is crucial for those of us who love to be in the ocean. With the help of AI software, drones in California are being used to monitor and track the whereabouts of sharks in the water, to help protect both us and them from getting into any Jaws-like altercations.

The AI has been trained to know what a number of different large shark species look like, which means they can tell the difference between shark species. It can also differentiate between sharks of the same species, meaning Bruce won’t get counted twice.

An app is available for life guards so they know how many (if any) sharks are lurking about at any given time of day.

Read more here

Conclusion

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