One place, many languages

One place, many languages

> One place, many languages Renee Dubé [January 24, 2020]

We’re talking language today and how diverse it can be even in the same country, or city! Germany is still a country divided when it comes to what a pancake should be called - maybe they should be called egg-cakes? Also Mandarin is now Melbourne and Sydney’s “most widely spoken community language.”

Language matters, it’s important culturally and on a deeper level to help us identify with ourselves and others.

Read on for a linguistic journey of the differences in language.

Germans Still Divided On Dialect

A split of a different kind
A split of a different kind

It’s been thirty years since the Berlin came down but there is still a divide between the east and west in Germany, at least linguistically.

A group of linguists who studied language in Germany for two years, discovered that there are linguistic differences between those who live in the east and west of the country; especially when it comes to food.

“West of the former Berlin Wall, Germans call a pancake a Pfannkuchen; on the eastern side, they emphatically tuck into Eierkuchen or “egg cakes”."

Try not to get hungry and delve into what makes vernacular language still so important in today’s society as you read this.

Read more here

The Word On The Street Is In Mandarin

Mandarin is now the common most spoken community language in Sydney
Mandarin is now the common most spoken community language in Sydney

A recent study has found that besides English, Mandarin is the most widely spoken language in both Sydney and Melbourne. “The number of Mandarin speakers in Sydney increased by 71 per cent between 2011 and 2016, according to a new book titled Multilingual Sydney: A city report."

The report found that multilingualism is not just in the inner city, with numerous suburbs in Sydney’s west becoming more and more diverse. Interestingly, there have found to be 20 different languages spoken in Sydney with over 20,000 people speaking them. Professor Phil Benson, co-editor of the book expects those numbers to increase.

This report is a fantastic read for anyone interested in the stats of various languages in our cities and what it means as we become more and more multicultural as a whole.

Read more here

Conclusion

We are very interested in the differences, and similarities, which language habits bring out. Some are shared, others are specific. Many are useful, and some tell us more about ourselves.

Our approach to try to understand this is through technology. If you are interested in trying out our technology, please try our platform or drop us an email at hello@videotranslator.ai.